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Technical Information

Route Server Information

ANIX is currently operating on a single public peering VLAN. ANIX operates two route servers which are redundant to allow the exchange of BGP announcements between members. Both route servers are configured on the same LAN. Each member of the exchange, needs to configure one single BGP connection to a route server in order to receive the BGP announcements of all the members.
More detailed information about an IX BGP route server can be found at RFC7947.

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BGP Parameters

rs1
Route Server 1
185.1.100.1
2001:7f8:bb::1
rs2
Route Server 2
185.1.100.2
2001:7f8:bb::2
rc1
Route Collector
185.1.100.3
2001:7f8:bb::3
ASN58137
RIR Macro (AS-SET)AS-SET-ANIX
AS-SET-ANIX-V6

The RIR Macro contains all AS-SETs of ANIX members. You can safely accept routes received from the route servers as all incoming BGP announcements are filtered based on an AS-SET provided in advance by the member.

For Cisco Routers, you will need a configuration similar to the following:

router bgp YOURASN
  no bgp enforce-first-as
 !
  ! Route server #1
  !
  neighbor 185.1.100.1 remote-as 58137
  neighbor 185.1.100.1 description ANIX RS1
  !
  address-family ipv4
   neighbor 185.1.100.1 password
   neighbor 185.1.100.1 activate
   neighbor 185.1.100.1 prefix-list announce-to-anix out
 !
  ! Route server #2
  !
  neighbor 185.1.100.2 remote-as 58137
  neighbor 185.1.100.2 description ANIX RS2
  !
  address-family ipv4
   neighbor 185.1.100.2 password
   neighbor 185.1.100.2 activate
   neighbor 185.1.100.2 prefix-list announce-to-anix out

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BGP Community Filtering

Coming Soon!

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AS112 Service

ANIX operates an AS112 server in house. This system provides anycast reverse DNS lookup for several prefixes, namely: 10.0.0.0/8 192.168.0.0/16 172.16.0.0/12 169.254.0.0/16 Because these IP addresses are widely used for private networks, many end-user systems are configured to perform reverse DNS lookups for these address ranges. DNS lookups for these ranges should always be null-answered quickly, in order to make sure that DNS retransmits don’t occur (thereby overloading local DNS resolvers), and to prevent end-user systems from hanging due to DNS lookups.

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